Tag Archives: Hospital

Curious, caring, compassionate: three characteristics of an aspiring respiratory therapy student

By Ashley Skinner

Death: a fact of life Texas State University senior respiratory therapy student Jacki Brewer is becoming familiar with as she takes on her career goals of becoming a respiratory therapist.

Brewer calculates the right dosage of medicine to give to a young patient in the emergency room at Georgetown Public Hospital. Too much medicine can cause complications, such as more difficulty breathing.                                                           Photo by Ashley Skinner/Global News Team.

“Of course I get scared and worried when things start to go wrong,” Brewer said. “You’re always going to worry about your patient, but the best way to put those bad thoughts aside is focusing on how to make the patient stable. You can’t worry about your feelings or yourself.”

When a patient’s family decides to take him or her off life support, a respiratory therapist is the one who disconnects the patient from the machines. For Brewer, this comes at a cost.

“Personally I step aside and get some fresh air,” Brewer said. “I’ll go pray and take a few deep breaths to clear my head. You can’t let it affect the rest of your day or you because you have other patients too. Your patients are your priorities; you can deal with yourself later.”

Brewer came to Texas State in 2014 from Carrollton, Texas. She chose Texas State because of the location between San Antonio and Austin, and because she felt like she immediately fit in on the campus.

Upon entering college, she did not know exactly what she wanted to do. However, once she realized there was a respiratory therapy program, her search for a major was over.

“In high school I was a home health aide and I took care of this really sweet, elderly lady,” Brewer said. “That experience paired with my asthma history is why I wanted to get into the field. I did my research once I heard about the profession at Texas State and I decided I wanted to be a part of that profession.”

Sharon Armstead, clinical assistant professor for respiratory therapy at Texas State, said Brewer is meant to be a respiratory therapist.

“She’s not scared to ask questions,” Armstead said. “She’s curious and shows initiative, and she isn’t afraid to take control of tough situations. That’s what a respiratory therapist needs to be.”

In January, Brewer went on a study abroad trip with Armstead to Guyana, South America, where she worked on patients with breathing issues in Georgetown Public

Brewer works alongside a doctor at Georgetown Public Hospital, attempting to stabilize a patient in the CICU.
Photo by Ashley Skinner/Global News Team

Hospital . Within 10 minutes of Brewer entering the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU), a patient began to show signs of being hypoxic: a condition in which the parts or regions of the body are deprived of adequate oxygen supply.

“I was really scared, this being my first time in their hospital with their equipment that I wasn’t familiar with,” Brewer said. “Once I got into it, I wasn’t scared and I think I handled it well. We got his stats back up and that’s all that matters.”

Armstead said at first she was worried about having Brewer in the CICU alone, but was impressed with how well she handled the patient with such urgency and care.

“She noticed the settings on the ventilator and that the patient was hypoxic immediately,” Armstead. “She bagged the patient. She suggested what changes should be made. She took control and she cares. That’s what I like about Jacki.”

Stephanie Kelley, senior respiratory therapy student at Texas State, went on the trip to Guyana and worked closely with Brewer while they were in the hospitals. Kelley also noticed how caring Brewer is with her patients.

“I don’t think anyone else is as observant as Jacki,” said Kelley. “She cares about her patients and people in general, and that’s one of her best characteristics.”

Listening to a person’s breathing before a treatment versus after, Brewer said, is a very rewarding feeling, as is being able to take a healthy person off of a ventilator.

“Their lungs go from sounding wet and crackly to sounding dry and clear and that’s proof of the work you’re doing,” Brewer said. “When someone is on a vent and is able to extubated, you get to take that tube out of their throat.  The first thing they say is ‘oh my goodness that feels so much better, thank you’ and hearing those words is the most rewarding part of my job.”

Above is a video of Brewer helping a doctor draw blood from a patient to test the level of gases in his blood.

This video is of Brewer aiding a nurse during a hospital-wide oxygen shut down. 

Videos by Ashley Skinner/Global News Team. 

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Georgetown Public Hospital receives knowledge, training about respiratory care

By Ashley Skinner

A group of Texas State University respiratory therapy students traveled to Guyana over the winter break to assist nurses and provide training to the developing nation.

Sheik Amir, director of medical and professional services at Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation, said there is a need for the specialty in Guyana.

“Respiratory care is a program we are trying to train our nurses to do more and more,” Amir said. “It has its advantages as a specialty, as it relieves nurses from doing all of the duties. A dedicated person doing something is always better than someone doing something they have to do only when they have a bit of time.”

Located in the northeastern tip of South America, Guyana is home to 10 hospitals in the private and public sectors. Respiratory diseases in the country are not regularly documented, due to the insufficient equipment to diagnose the problems, said Sharon Armstead, a respiratory therapist and Texas State University clinical assistant professor who led the study abroad program to Guyana.

“If you look at the diagnostic numbers, they’ll be low,” Armstead said.

According to the numbers that are reported, Guyana ranks second highest in asthma mortality rates. Graphic by Ashley Skinner/Global News Team

“This is because you can’t report a disease if you don’t have the tools to diagnose it.” 

While the diseases are not frequently detected, they do not go unnoticed.

“I hope the hospital staff will learn more developed procedures from the [respiratory care] team,” said Elizabeth Gonsalves, deputy CEO of Georgetown Public Hospital. “We are happy to have Texas State here to help us deal with the respiratory problems of Guyana.”

The Ministry of Public Health oversees the delivery of health care services throughout Guyana, as well as distributes funds to hospitals from the financial resources allocated to the Ministry.

“I take great pride in my country,” said the Honorable Volda Lawrence, the minister of public health. “The ministry is doing everything it can to make Guyana a First World country health system.”

Amir said a lack of funding plays a big part in the country not having respiratory therapy as a specialty in the country.

“There won’t be any funding until we have a person here telling us what we need for the specialty,” Amir said. “If you don’t think of something, you won’t be budgeting for it. Now that it’s being put out there and talked about, people will start looking at how to grow the profession.”

With funding allocated to the hospital for equipment, more places than just the emergency room will be able to tend to respiratory problems.

“Getting respiratory therapy brought to Guyana is definitely something we want and need to look into,” Gonsalves said. “Respiratory care as a specialty will help our hospital be able to have more diagnosis stations than just the ER, as that is where most of the diagnoses’ happen.”

Additionally, Gonsalves said there are plans to discuss growing this profession at the board level in due time, as respiratory diseases are becoming a bigger problem.

Originally from Guyana, Armstead remembers her asthma acting up as a child in the country due to the mining for bauxite in the town of Linden.

“Coming back here my asthma still gets bad when I go to Linden,” Armstead said. “When we come to this city, my chest gets a little tighter and it’s harder to breathe.”

Armstead travels to Guyana at least once a year on mission trips through Bridges Global Medical Missions. This organization is also the one that led the study abroad trip, headed by the Atlanta-based nonprofit’s vice president and medical director, Claudette Heyliger-Thomas.

“We wanted to bring Texas State and respiratory therapy to this country in hopes to push patient care to where it needs to be,” Heyliger-Thomas said.

In the Georgetown Public intensive care unit, students Xiomara Ojeda, Jacki Brewer and Stephanie Kelly listen as Armstead tells them their duties for the day. Photo by Skyler Jennings/Global News Team

“I’m glad they have gotten to experience what the medial world is like in a developing country.”

The CHEST foundation, an organization dedicated to championing lung health by supporting clinical research, patient education and community service, awarded Armstead a $11,530 grant to fund the donation of respiratory medical equipment to the Georgetown and Linden hospitals.

“We plan to donate as much equipment as we can because we want Guyana to see the importance of respiratory care,” Armstead said. “When I look around, I see nurses, not respiratory therapists. You can’t have a hospital without this profession and I believe we can bring it to Guyana.”

Texas State provides respiratory care in Guyana

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Texas State University respiratory care students, Jennifer Cruz and Bobby Shane Rodgers, intubate an intensive care unit patient at Georgetown Public Hospital. Photo by Alana Zamora / Global News Team.
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Respiratory care student, Bobby Shane Rodgers, carefully measures Ipratropium Bromide Solution to insert into a nebulizer for a patient’s treatment. Photo by Alana Zamora / Global News Team.
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Georgetown Public Hospital patient receives a breathing treatment under the care of Texas State University respiratory care students. Photo by Alana Zamora / Global News Team.

To see the Texas State University respiratory care students in action at Georgetown Public Hospital, watch the video below:

 

A look at Georgetown Public Hospital through photos, video

Texas State Respiratory Therapy students traveled to Georgetown, Guyana on Jan. 2 to give respiratory care at the local high school and hospital.

Below is a slideshow of photos, depicting the time students spent in the hospital, followed by a video tour.

Photos and video by Ashley Skinner/Global News Team.