Tag Archives: life

The ways I’ve changed

When I left for my study abroad trip in January, I did not think that I was a journalist. I was afraid that my skills would not stack up against the other students that I was headed there with. I had never been off of my own continent and I was just afraid of being away from the safety and security of my own bubble.

When I left for my study abroad trip, I did not think that I would grow to care so much about the group of people that I was with. Strangers at the start of the year and, now, people that I hope to keep in touch with even after the semester has ended. We learned something from each other, and that is what has changed me.

Skyler, a journalism student, that faced her fears and left her comfort of home just as I did. She is brave and can survive any bug bite that she is faced with (at least with an EpiPen in tow). She showed me that I wasn’t alone in my fear and discomfort and that I would be okay, just like she was.

Alana, a fellow Public Relations major, showed me what it means to truly care about and have a passion for the field that you are going into. She is passionate about museums, latinx history, art and photography. From her, I learned to find something that I love and never stop chasing that.

Katie, the sassiest and most outspoken of the group, is so involved in reporting news and writing the best stories that she can. She taught me what it really means to be a journalist and helped me gain skills that I didn’t know I had–like interviewing, gathering sources and being confident in what you are writing about.

Ashley, the inspiring and resilient nineteen year old, really showed me that even if you have been in the trenches at points in your life, you can rise above and come out on top. We shared our stories of childhood and found many points that we could relate on. She is a strong woman who has set her mind to whatever she wants, and I know that she can achieve her dreams. I wish that I had been more like her when I started off as a student–determined, passionate and hard-working.

Last, but certainly not least, Holly Lynn Wise. The most inspiring woman that I have met in my college career. Holly pushed me and convinced me to go on the study abroad trip two days before the application was due. I learned how to use my writing skills, thanks to her, and for that I am very grateful. Journalism aside, I am now passionate about finding my place in the world and using my skills to add to it. Holly showed me what it means to be career-driven and to take your life and run with it. She is caring, kind, compassionate, and I am excited to watch how the next chapter of her life unfolds. I hope she knows how much she means to me and that I would not trade the experiences that I had because of her for anything.

I will not view my life in the same way I did before I left on my study abroad trip. I have determination and the drive to use my skills and have an effect on the world around me.

Featured photo by Alana Zamora/Global News Team

Advertisements

Why I chose to go to a developing country and loved it

We flew into the country around 10 p.m. on Jan. 2. My heart was racing. The flight crew announced we would be getting off of the plane from the back. I thought, “I never realized they could hook one of those hallway things up to the end.”

I could not have been more wrong.

On our journey back to the states, we boarded the plane from the tail-end just as we descended it at the beginning of our adventure to Guyana.

We walked down the airplane stairs right onto the tarmac. Everyone had their phones out preparing to snapchat the unfamiliar circumstance when most of us realized we did not have phone service. Through my phone camera lens, I saw a tattered building under construction, a structure resembling a home and a few planes stored off to the side.

We approached the home-like building only to figure out it was baggage claim and customs. What kind of airport was this?

Going into this, I knew it would be a different experience. I knew we would not have phone service unless we paid for an international plan. I knew Wi-Fi access would be limited. I knew it was a developing country. I knew people would be poor. I knew I would see things that in the states would be considered dreadful and horrific.

Yet, somehow, these people were (mostly) content with their lives.

Being from the United States, I wanted to experience a culture outside the privileged one I live here. Not only did I accomplish this, but I also began to realize the image we think of when we imagine developing countries is skewed to fit our mindset.

Most people who have not been to a developing country and are from the U.S. might think of the commercials we see on TV of starving kids in huts who have no clothes. While that perception of developing countries is not wrong, as many developing countries have these aspects, it is not all they have.

A wide variety of cultural booths can be found outside of Stabroek Market in Georgetown, Guyana.

They have a community who deeply cares for one another; a community who makes use of the resources available to live the best possible life. While diversity is a huge aspect of Guyana, people there identify as Guyanese, despite their African, Amerindian, British, Chinese, Dutch, Indian or Portuguese roots. Guyana has a society that takes pride in their country, even if, by some American standards, it isn’t a place to which many people would willingly move.

Tell any Guyanese on the street where you are from, and the first thing they will greet you with is, “Welcome to the greatest place on Earth.”

To the people of Guyana, life isn’t prioritized around technology and connecting through a screen.

Life in Guyana is about living in the moment, as you are, where you are and as best as you can.

And that is an amazing perspective I will carry with me forever.